Ancient dating customs

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Many women would initiate the courtship, and partners would send love letters to each other, writes Walter Hazen in Ancient Times.

Marriage and family life were important in ancient Egyptian society and some women would marry young, typically around the age of 12.

In traditional Muslim practices, a young man or woman who is looking to marry finds a matchmaker, if he or she does not meet a suitable partner socially through friends, gatherings, school or work, according to Marriage Customs of the World by George Monger.

When a match is made, the prospective groom sends a female relative from his family to the prospective bride's father to offer marriage.

Marriages were most likely arranged through families, and no marriage ceremony was performed.

Many young Greek people prefer to find their own life partner without their parents’ intervention, usually through work and socializing.

Sue Blundell, in her book, “Women In Ancient Greece,” reveals that marriage contests, where many suitors vie for the hand of one woman, were common in Bronze Age Greece.

A famous example involves Cleisthenes, tyrant of Sicyon, in early sixth century BC.

Greek dating websites help Greek people to get together and are useful for those who live and work abroad but still want to meet and marry someone from their own country.

The Internet exemplifies the modern trend for young Greek men and woman to choose their own partners.

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